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Articles Tagged with water safety

water_safety_AdobeStock_278714985-300x200Reminders regarding water safety precautions aimed at preventing drowning accidents are prevalent, particularly this time of year. But there are two other events – dry drowning and secondary drowning – that can be just as dangerous yet are not as widely publicized.

Both conditions are usually predicated by a near drowning event and, although the two terms often are used interchangeably, there are significant differences. In dry drowning, inhaled water causes muscles in the airway to spasm blocking airflow. In secondary drowning, on the other hand, water is inhaled into the lungs filling them with water and making breathing difficult. While both conditions can occur in adults, they affect young children more often.

To learn more about the symptoms of dry drowning and secondary drowning and the preventative steps you can take to avoid these accidents, read “Should I Worry about Dry Drowning and Secondary Drowning?

water-safety-tips-400-05103031d-199x300A New Jersey teen recently suffered serious injury after falling 35 feet into a secluded swimming hole in upstate New York. Fortunately, she was with friends who were able to call for help. However, the remote location of the swimming hole hindered first responders’ efforts, prolonging their rescue attempts and increasing the dangers not only to the victim but to the first responders themselves. One reason swimmers are advised to stay in designated areas supervised by lifeguards is so that help, if they should need it, can get to them safely and efficiently.

As inviting as it may be to jump into the nearest body of water – whether it be a pool, the ocean, a nearby lake or swimming hole – to beat the heat during the dog days of summer, failing to take precautions can quickly turn this enjoyable pastime into tragedy. Each summer there are stories of young children falling into backyard pools or strong swimmers being caught in riptides proving that point. To avoid tragedies like these from falling on you or your loved ones, familiarize yourself with the Swimming Safety Tips issued by the American Red Cross and stay diligent.

rip-currents-400-04208127d-300x300For many who live in New Jersey, a trip to the beach is an enjoyable summer tradition, but fun can quickly turn to tragedy for those who don’t pay attention to surf forecasts.

Already this year, the Jersey shore has seen more fatalities and injuries related to rip currents than in all of the 2016 summer season. Rip currents are strong, swift channels of water that can carry swimmers out to sea before they even realize the danger. These currents move at speeds ranging from one to eight feet per second – faster than even an Olympic swimmer can swim. While rip currents rarely pull swimmers under water, they can pull them far from the shoreline. That’s when panic sets in. Swimmers who try to swim against the current tire out and can either drown or suffer injuries that require hospitalization.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association (NOAA) advises beach-goers to check the surf conditions before venturing into the water and, if you do get caught in a rip current, stay calm. See NOAA’s video for more rip current safety tips.

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