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safety_features_AdobeStock_272596255-1-300x199Each year it seems the automobile industry introduces new technologies designed to make driving easier and safer and to help us avoid accidents and related injuries. But do these technologies help, or do they lead to even more accidents resulting from driver inattention?

A recent study by AAA suggests the answer to that question could depend, at least in part, on the names used when marketing these advanced technology systems. For further details read, “AAA Study: Drivers Too Willing to Abandon Responsibility to Technology.”

hand_sanitizer_AdobeStock_327266102-300x169Frequent and thorough handwashing is one of the activities said to be an important step in helping prevent the spread of COVID-19. And when you don’t have access to soap and water, using a hand sanitizer is the next best thing — or is it?

While hand sanitizers may help stop the spread of germs, it has been reported that certain hand sanitizers contain potentially life-threatening chemicals which can be harmful when ingested or absorbed through the skin. Initially, consumers were warned to avoid hand sanitizers containing methanol. More recently, that list was expanded to also include those that contained 1-propanol.

For more details on what to look for – or avoid – when shopping for your hand sanitizers, read “FDA warns about new hand sanitizer ingredient, expands list of dangerous products to 149.”

water_safety_AdobeStock_278714985-300x200Reminders regarding water safety precautions aimed at preventing drowning accidents are prevalent, particularly this time of year. But there are two other events – dry drowning and secondary drowning – that can be just as dangerous yet are not as widely publicized.

Both conditions are usually predicated by a near drowning event and, although the two terms often are used interchangeably, there are significant differences. In dry drowning, inhaled water causes muscles in the airway to spasm blocking airflow. In secondary drowning, on the other hand, water is inhaled into the lungs filling them with water and making breathing difficult. While both conditions can occur in adults, they affect young children more often.

To learn more about the symptoms of dry drowning and secondary drowning and the preventative steps you can take to avoid these accidents, read “Should I Worry about Dry Drowning and Secondary Drowning?

hot-car-deaths-AdobeStock_118785403-300x200The official start of summer is still a few days away and already there have been four child fatalities related to hot cars in this county this year, according to the National Safety Council. A recent nj.com article on the arrest of a Paterson, NJ mother on child endangerment charges after leaving her two children unattended in her car while she shopped at a local store brought to mind the need for reminders on the dangers of this activity. According to the article, the outside temperature at the time was 85 degrees, while the temperature in the car climbed to 140 degrees by the time firefighters rescued the children.

According to kars4kids.org, in the summer it can take only 15 minutes for temperatures in an automobile to climb to 109 degrees; a child’s internal organs begin to shut down when temperatures reach 104 degrees – evidence that even a short errand can result in devastating injury. For some tips to help ensure this doesn’t happen to someone you love, read “Preventing Hot Car Deaths: 6 Facts & Tips for Parents.”

internet-challenge-400-05697175d-300x200There are all kinds of internet challenges out there these days – many are fun, silly activities meant to promote laughter; some are designed to raise awareness of, and/or funds for, a good cause; and yet others are mean-spirited and dangerous. With remote learning and stay-at-home orders currently in effect, our children have even greater opportunities now to spend more time online, increasing their exposure to questionable content. Parents today have even more cause to be diligent in protecting their children from dangers and injuries associated with their online activities.

One internet challenge that has been making the rounds in recent months is the “skull-breaker challenge,” so named because of the potential injuries that can be suffered by the challenge’s unwitting victims. To learn more about this challenge and how to protect your children from potential injuries, read “SuperParenting: The Skull Breaker Challenge, Explained.”

virus-PI-400-08838346d-300x200By taking these steps, we can all do our part to help stop the spread of the Coronavirus:

  1. If you feel sick, stay home and contact your medical provider.
  2. If someone in your house has tested positive, keep your entire household at home and contact your medical provider.

Super-Lawyers-Blog-300x251Victor A. Rotolo has been named by the Thomson Reuters organization to the list of New Jersey Super Lawyers for 2020 and Charles C. Rifici has been named to the organization’s 2020 list of New Jersey Rising Stars.

Mr. Rotolo, founding partner of Rotolo Karch Law, primarily focuses on personal injury, family law and criminal defense cases, while Mr. Rifici, an attorney with the Firm since 2014, concentrates primarily on civil litigation, family law and criminal defense. This is the 15th consecutive year that Mr. Rotolo has received this recognition and the 4th consecutive year for Mr. Rifici. For more details, see “Rotolo Karch Law Attorneys Named to the New Jersey Super Lawyers and Rising Stars Lists for 2020.”

DWI-PI-Blog-400-04490494d-300x200You might assume that in order to be charged and convicted of a DWI or DUI you would need to be driving a motor vehicle, but that is not necessarily the case in New Jersey.

Recently, a New Jersey State Appellate Court upheld the DWI conviction of a man who was found sleeping behind the wheel of a car with the motor running, citing a technicality with the wording of the State law. Read “You don’t have to be driving to be convicted of DWI in New Jersey” to learn more.

vacation-injuries-400-05910605d-300x200Vacation booking companies make it convenient to get the most out of your vacation by serving as a one-stop outlet for reserving all of your accommodations, including activities and excursions operated by third parties. But what happens if something goes wrong on one of those excursions resulting in injury? Is the booking company liable and, if so, to what extent?

Those are questions being considered in a recent lawsuit filed by a New Jersey woman against TripAdvisor and one of its brands, Viator. The lawsuit seeks to hold TripAdvisor liable for injuries allegedly suffered by the woman while on a camel ride tour that was booked through the booking company but operated by a third party. For further details about this case read, “Tour Injury Lawsuit Tests Whether TripAdvisor Is Liability-Free.”

garden-center-worker-400-06802691d-300x200There are certain jobs you would expect to carry a high risk of job-related injury – emergency first-responders, high-rise window cleaners, miners, road repair crews, oil field workers – to name a few. On the other hand, you may consider other jobs relatively safe but you could be surprised.

According to recently released federal labor data, full-time retail workers suffered a higher rate of job-related injuries than workers in other potentially hazardous fields. Which industry has the highest potential for injury? Read “Toughest jobs? Try working in a pet store” to find out.

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