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hot-car-deaths-AdobeStock_118785403-300x200The official start of summer is still a few days away and already there have been four child fatalities related to hot cars in this county this year, according to the National Safety Council. A recent nj.com article on the arrest of a Paterson, NJ mother on child endangerment charges after leaving her two children unattended in her car while she shopped at a local store brought to mind the need for reminders on the dangers of this activity. According to the article, the outside temperature at the time was 85 degrees, while the temperature in the car climbed to 140 degrees by the time firefighters rescued the children.

According to kars4kids.org, in the summer it can take only 15 minutes for temperatures in an automobile to climb to 109 degrees; a child’s internal organs begin to shut down when temperatures reach 104 degrees – evidence that even a short errand can result in devastating injury. For some tips to help ensure this doesn’t happen to someone you love, read “Preventing Hot Car Deaths: 6 Facts & Tips for Parents.”

internet-challenge-400-05697175d-300x200There are all kinds of internet challenges out there these days – many are fun, silly activities meant to promote laughter; some are designed to raise awareness of, and/or funds for, a good cause; and yet others are mean-spirited and dangerous. With remote learning and stay-at-home orders currently in effect, our children have even greater opportunities now to spend more time online, increasing their exposure to questionable content. Parents today have even more cause to be diligent in protecting their children from dangers and injuries associated with their online activities.

One internet challenge that has been making the rounds in recent months is the “skull-breaker challenge,” so named because of the potential injuries that can be suffered by the challenge’s unwitting victims. To learn more about this challenge and how to protect your children from potential injuries, read “SuperParenting: The Skull Breaker Challenge, Explained.”

virus-PI-400-08838346d-300x200By taking these steps, we can all do our part to help stop the spread of the Coronavirus:

  1. If you feel sick, stay home and contact your medical provider.
  2. If someone in your house has tested positive, keep your entire household at home and contact your medical provider.

Super-Lawyers-Blog-300x251Victor A. Rotolo has been named by the Thomson Reuters organization to the list of New Jersey Super Lawyers for 2020 and Charles C. Rifici has been named to the organization’s 2020 list of New Jersey Rising Stars.

Mr. Rotolo, founding partner of Rotolo Karch Law, primarily focuses on personal injury, family law and criminal defense cases, while Mr. Rifici, an attorney with the Firm since 2014, concentrates primarily on civil litigation, family law and criminal defense. This is the 15th consecutive year that Mr. Rotolo has received this recognition and the 4th consecutive year for Mr. Rifici. For more details, see “Rotolo Karch Law Attorneys Named to the New Jersey Super Lawyers and Rising Stars Lists for 2020.”

DWI-PI-Blog-400-04490494d-300x200You might assume that in order to be charged and convicted of a DWI or DUI you would need to be driving a motor vehicle, but that is not necessarily the case in New Jersey.

Recently, a New Jersey State Appellate Court upheld the DWI conviction of a man who was found sleeping behind the wheel of a car with the motor running, citing a technicality with the wording of the State law. Read “You don’t have to be driving to be convicted of DWI in New Jersey” to learn more.

vacation-injuries-400-05910605d-300x200Vacation booking companies make it convenient to get the most out of your vacation by serving as a one-stop outlet for reserving all of your accommodations, including activities and excursions operated by third parties. But what happens if something goes wrong on one of those excursions resulting in injury? Is the booking company liable and, if so, to what extent?

Those are questions being considered in a recent lawsuit filed by a New Jersey woman against TripAdvisor and one of its brands, Viator. The lawsuit seeks to hold TripAdvisor liable for injuries allegedly suffered by the woman while on a camel ride tour that was booked through the booking company but operated by a third party. For further details about this case read, “Tour Injury Lawsuit Tests Whether TripAdvisor Is Liability-Free.”

garden-center-worker-400-06802691d-300x200There are certain jobs you would expect to carry a high risk of job-related injury – emergency first-responders, high-rise window cleaners, miners, road repair crews, oil field workers – to name a few. On the other hand, you may consider other jobs relatively safe but you could be surprised.

According to recently released federal labor data, full-time retail workers suffered a higher rate of job-related injuries than workers in other potentially hazardous fields. Which industry has the highest potential for injury? Read “Toughest jobs? Try working in a pet store” to find out.

Young-passengers-400-04526567d-300x200The recent drop in temperature was a sudden reminder that winter is on its way – time to break out the heavy coats and other cold weather gear. For drivers, it’s also time to reassess your safety checklist before hitting the road, especially when travelling with young children.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) reminds us that it can be just as dangerous to leave young children alone in a car during the winter as it is in the summer. Children are more susceptible than adults to injuries from the cold.

In light of this, it can be challenging to keep young children warm and safe while  in the car. Bulky winter clothing can interfere with the harnesses of child car seats, resulting in a fit too loose to protect the child in the event of an accident. For tips on how to overcome this and other winter hazards, read the NHTSA’s article “Keep Your Little Ones Warm and Safe in Their Car Seats.

halloween-blog-400-04275425d-300x200It seems like almost from the moment summer ends and school starts, kids (and by default their parents) start thinking about Halloween: the costumes, the parties, the trick-or-treating and, of course, the treats. It’s a fun time of year, but it is also one that is fraught with risks.

Almost everything associated with the holiday – from the decorations to the costumes to the treats – harbors the potential for injury. As a parent, you want to make sure your kids’ costumes won’t catch fire, cause them to trip or impede their vision, and that they use caution when walking on dark roads. Property owners want to provide a safe path for trick-or-treaters and hosts want to take care that their guests are aware of possible food allergens. Fortunately, there are still two weeks before the holiday – plenty of time to take an assessment and remedy any risks you may find. This Halloween safety checklist can help you identify some potential problems you may otherwise overlook.

teen-driver-crash-risk-400-04575501d-300x200Lack of skill and experience may be partially to blame for the high rate of serious car accidents involving teen drivers, but it doesn’t explain the disparities in risk levels among equally inexperienced drivers. Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania’s Annenberg Public Policy Centre may have found the answer.

The researchers discovered a link between the rate of development of a teen driver’s ‘working memory’ and his or her crash risk. “Working memory’ is associated with the ability to accurately perform moment-to-moment tasks that are essential to safe driving.

Teen driving statistics are frightening. According to the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety, drivers in the 17- to 19-year-old age group are at a higher risk of being involved in a motor vehicle accident than drivers in any other age group. In fact, drivers age 16 to 17 are nine times more likely than adult drivers to get into an accident and six times more likely to be involved in a fatal accident. Can this new information be used to improve these numbers and keep our teens safe on the road? Read “Study links youths’ slow ‘working memory’ to high crash rates” to find out.

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