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Articles Posted in Injuries

internet-challenge-400-05697175d-300x200There are all kinds of internet challenges out there these days – many are fun, silly activities meant to promote laughter; some are designed to raise awareness of, and/or funds for, a good cause; and yet others are mean-spirited and dangerous. With remote learning and stay-at-home orders currently in effect, our children have even greater opportunities now to spend more time online, increasing their exposure to questionable content. Parents today have even more cause to be diligent in protecting their children from dangers and injuries associated with their online activities.

One internet challenge that has been making the rounds in recent months is the “skull-breaker challenge,” so named because of the potential injuries that can be suffered by the challenge’s unwitting victims. To learn more about this challenge and how to protect your children from potential injuries, read “SuperParenting: The Skull Breaker Challenge, Explained.”

virus-PI-400-08838346d-300x200By taking these steps, we can all do our part to help stop the spread of the Coronavirus:

  1. If you feel sick, stay home and contact your medical provider.
  2. If someone in your house has tested positive, keep your entire household at home and contact your medical provider.

vacation-injuries-400-05910605d-300x200Vacation booking companies make it convenient to get the most out of your vacation by serving as a one-stop outlet for reserving all of your accommodations, including activities and excursions operated by third parties. But what happens if something goes wrong on one of those excursions resulting in injury? Is the booking company liable and, if so, to what extent?

Those are questions being considered in a recent lawsuit filed by a New Jersey woman against TripAdvisor and one of its brands, Viator. The lawsuit seeks to hold TripAdvisor liable for injuries allegedly suffered by the woman while on a camel ride tour that was booked through the booking company but operated by a third party. For further details about this case read, “Tour Injury Lawsuit Tests Whether TripAdvisor Is Liability-Free.”

garden-center-worker-400-06802691d-300x200There are certain jobs you would expect to carry a high risk of job-related injury – emergency first-responders, high-rise window cleaners, miners, road repair crews, oil field workers – to name a few. On the other hand, you may consider other jobs relatively safe but you could be surprised.

According to recently released federal labor data, full-time retail workers suffered a higher rate of job-related injuries than workers in other potentially hazardous fields. Which industry has the highest potential for injury? Read “Toughest jobs? Try working in a pet store” to find out.

Young-passengers-400-04526567d-300x200The recent drop in temperature was a sudden reminder that winter is on its way – time to break out the heavy coats and other cold weather gear. For drivers, it’s also time to reassess your safety checklist before hitting the road, especially when travelling with young children.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) reminds us that it can be just as dangerous to leave young children alone in a car during the winter as it is in the summer. Children are more susceptible than adults to injuries from the cold.

In light of this, it can be challenging to keep young children warm and safe while  in the car. Bulky winter clothing can interfere with the harnesses of child car seats, resulting in a fit too loose to protect the child in the event of an accident. For tips on how to overcome this and other winter hazards, read the NHTSA’s article “Keep Your Little Ones Warm and Safe in Their Car Seats.

halloween-blog-400-04275425d-300x200It seems like almost from the moment summer ends and school starts, kids (and by default their parents) start thinking about Halloween: the costumes, the parties, the trick-or-treating and, of course, the treats. It’s a fun time of year, but it is also one that is fraught with risks.

Almost everything associated with the holiday – from the decorations to the costumes to the treats – harbors the potential for injury. As a parent, you want to make sure your kids’ costumes won’t catch fire, cause them to trip or impede their vision, and that they use caution when walking on dark roads. Property owners want to provide a safe path for trick-or-treaters and hosts want to take care that their guests are aware of possible food allergens. Fortunately, there are still two weeks before the holiday – plenty of time to take an assessment and remedy any risks you may find. This Halloween safety checklist can help you identify some potential problems you may otherwise overlook.

water-safety-tips-400-05103031d-199x300A New Jersey teen recently suffered serious injury after falling 35 feet into a secluded swimming hole in upstate New York. Fortunately, she was with friends who were able to call for help. However, the remote location of the swimming hole hindered first responders’ efforts, prolonging their rescue attempts and increasing the dangers not only to the victim but to the first responders themselves. One reason swimmers are advised to stay in designated areas supervised by lifeguards is so that help, if they should need it, can get to them safely and efficiently.

As inviting as it may be to jump into the nearest body of water – whether it be a pool, the ocean, a nearby lake or swimming hole – to beat the heat during the dog days of summer, failing to take precautions can quickly turn this enjoyable pastime into tragedy. Each summer there are stories of young children falling into backyard pools or strong swimmers being caught in riptides proving that point. To avoid tragedies like these from falling on you or your loved ones, familiarize yourself with the Swimming Safety Tips issued by the American Red Cross and stay diligent.

electric-scooter-400-03992047d-200x300There has been a noticeable increase in the popularity of electric scooters in recent years and, with that, an increase in the number of facial and head injuries being reported by emergency departments. According to a recent Rutgers study, the correlation between the two may be due, at least in part, to a lack of standardized regulations.

The study revealed that over the past 10 years, emergency departments reported 990 injuries to the head and face directly resulting from electric scooter use. Most of the injured were men ranging in age from 19 to 65 years; although 33 percent of those injured were children between the ages of 6 and 12 years. The study further disclosed that 66 percent of those injured reported that they were not wearing helmets while riding.

Laws regulating electric scooters and the use of helmets and other protective gear vary by state and those variations can be significant. Some states have no regulations regarding electric scooters or helmet usage while others, like New Jersey, apply the same laws to electric scooters as they do to bicycles. Read “E-Scooter Injuries on the Rise; Researchers Urge Helmet Laws” for further details.

bounce-house-400-05289821d-200x300Summer brings a number of reasons for family and friend outdoor get-togethers: graduations, birthdays, holiday celebrations, family reunions. If you’re plans include renting a bounce house to entertain the kids – both the little ones and the older ones – be aware of the potential dangers these structures present and how to avoid injuries to your guests.

News reports earlier this month disclosed that five students suffered injuries when a bounce house featured at a high school event was lifted 20 feet in the air by a strong gust of wind. Unfortunately, this wasn’t an isolated incident. There have been a number of injuries reported in recent years from bounce house accidents in which high winds caused the houses to become untethered and blow away. For tips on how to avoid this from happening at your next outdoor celebration, read “Bounce house flies away . . .

baby-walkers-400-06876419d-300x200The past couple of decades has seen a significant reduction in the number of baby walker-related injuries thanks to stricter safety standards, but is that enough? Not according to the American Academy of Pediatrics and at least one New Jersey lawmaker who want to see a ban on the sale of these items.

Baby walkers are used by very young children full of curiosity but totally unaware of the potential dangers around them. On top of that, these devises allow babies to travel at surprisingly quick speeds – up to 4 feet per second. This combination leads to thousands of injuries each year

Sen. Linda Greenstein (D-Middlesex) recently introduced a bill that would prohibit anyone in the State from selling baby walkers and impose fines of $10,000 for first-time offenders and $20,000 for subsequent violations. Although the bill was endorsed by the Senate Law & Public Safety Committee this past February, it does not have a companion bill in the Assembly nor a sponsor other than Greenstein. What’s more is that opponents claim such a State ban may be prohibited under Federal law. To learn more read, “New Jersey senator wants baby walkers removed from stores.”

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