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Articles Tagged with pedestrian accidents

Share-the-Road-PI-blog-300x200Drivers in New Jersey now face new regulations aimed at making the State’s roadways safer for all users – motorists, pedestrians, and cyclists alike.

On August 5, Gov. Phil Murphy signed into law measures intended to decrease the number of accidents involving motor vehicles and others using the roads by requiring drivers to move over a lane when passing pedestrians, bicyclists or scooter riders. If changing lanes cannot be done safely, drivers are required to slow down and be prepared to stop if necessary. Failure to comply could result in fines and possible points against the driver’s license.

The pandemic and its related restrictions resulted in less vehicular traffic but more people walking and riding bikes and scooters on the roads. With restrictions now loosening and more people returning to their places of employment, motor vehicle traffic is on an uptick. NJ State Police records show that the number of pedestrian fatalities reported so far this year almost match the number reported for 2020 and are on track to result in an increase of 60%. To learn more about this new law read, “Drivers must now move over when passing people walking and on bikes.”

PedestrianSafety_AdobeStock_229760658-300x200Walking has become quite the popular activity in 2020, with so many of us looking for an easy alternative to our otherwise restricted exercise routines or simply for a diversion from being cooped up at home. With this increased pedestrian traffic, comes an increased risk for accidents, prompting the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration to declare October National Pedestrian Safety Month.

Regardless of whether you believe it is the pedestrian’s or the motorist’s responsibility, there are precautions both can take to help avoid accidents. It is especially important now with the end of Daylight Savings Time approaching that both walkers and drivers take steps to stay safe. For some tips, read the NHTSA’s “October is National Pedestrian Safety Month.”

Safety Sensors - photo of windshield of yellow school busAlthough a law requiring all new school buses in New Jersey to be equipped with sensors that would alert drivers if someone or something was passing in front of or behind their vehicles was signed more than a year ago, most school districts have yet to implement it.

Abigail’s Law, named after Abigail Kuberiet, a two-year-old who died in 2003 after being struck while walking in front of a school bus, was adopted in an effort to prevent similar accidents in the future. However, regulations regarding the implementation of the law are still under review by the State Department of Education. School districts are hesitant to install the sensors, estimated to cost between $1,750 and $2,500 per bus, until the regulations are released. To learn more, read “New Jersey School Buses Still Unequipped With Safety Sensors.”

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