Articles Posted in Injuries

rip-currents-400-04208127d-300x300For many who live in New Jersey, a trip to the beach is an enjoyable summer tradition, but fun can quickly turn to tragedy for those who don’t pay attention to surf forecasts.

Already this year, the Jersey shore has seen more fatalities and injuries related to rip currents than in all of the 2016 summer season. Rip currents are strong, swift channels of water that can carry swimmers out to sea before they even realize the danger. These currents move at speeds ranging from one to eight feet per second – faster than even an Olympic swimmer can swim. While rip currents rarely pull swimmers under water, they can pull them far from the shoreline. That’s when panic sets in. Swimmers who try to swim against the current tire out and can either drown or suffer injuries that require hospitalization.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association (NOAA) advises beach-goers to check the surf conditions before venturing into the water and, if you do get caught in a rip current, stay calm. See NOAA’s video for more rip current safety tips.

helmets-400-04409904d-300x200Does your child wear a helmet every time he or she rides a bike? What about when rollerblading or riding a scooter or skateboard? With summer approaching, these activities become more popular, affording children the opportunity to get both fresh air and exercise. That’s great provided children practice good safety habits.

Research recently showed that more than 425,000 children are injured each year as a result of wheeled sports. While broken bones are the most frequently reported injury, serious head injuries also rank fairly high, leading doctors to emphasize the importance of wearing safety helmets when engaged in any wheeled sporting activity.

On a positive note, the research showed a significant decrease in the number of bicycle-related injuries; however, injuries from another wheeled sport have been on the rise. Do you know which one? Read “Falls sent 426,000 kids to ERs in a year, new study finds” to find out.

dog-bites-mailman-400-07471430d-300x169As cliché as it may sound, dog attacks on mail carriers are a real issue and one that is growing.

Each year the U.S. Postal Service releases statistics on the number of dog attacks against its carriers in connection with National Dog Bite Prevention Week (August 9 – 15). According to this year’s figures, there were 6,755 dog attacks against mail carriers in 2016, an increase of 206 from 2015. The good news is that the severity of the attacks appears to be on the decline according to insurance claims.

The reason behind this increase? It could have something to do with the rising popularity of online retail sales, which has led to a double-digit increase in package business for the Post Office. To learn more about this growing problem and ways in which you can keep from becoming part of it, read “Dog Attacks on Mail Carriers Rise Again as Online Sales Boom.”

Distracted driving photo of arms of driver with one hand on steering wheel and the other operating a cell phoneDespite all the warnings about the dangers, drivers in the U.S. continue to operate cell phones while behind the wheel. In fact, according to the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration (NHTSA), about 660,000 drivers can be found using their cell phones in some manner at any given time.

Safety issues related to distracted driving have reached epidemic proportions over the past 10 years, resulting in an average of 3,000 deaths and 450,000 injuries due to distracted driving-related accidents each year. While cell phones represent only one of the distractions drivers face today, it is believed they divert drivers’ attention more often and for longer stretches of time than other distractions. Will adopting more laws restricting cell phone use cure this epidemic? Read “Liberty v. Tyranny: More States Pass Laws Outlawing Cell Phone Use While Driving” to reach your own conclusions.

Safety Sensors - photo of windshield of yellow school busAlthough a law requiring all new school buses in New Jersey to be equipped with sensors that would alert drivers if someone or something was passing in front of or behind their vehicles was signed more than a year ago, most school districts have yet to implement it.

Abigail’s Law, named after Abigail Kuberiet, a two-year-old who died in 2003 after being struck while walking in front of a school bus, was adopted in an effort to prevent similar accidents in the future. However, regulations regarding the implementation of the law are still under review by the State Department of Education. School districts are hesitant to install the sensors, estimated to cost between $1,750 and $2,500 per bus, until the regulations are released. To learn more, read “New Jersey School Buses Still Unequipped With Safety Sensors.”

boating-safety-400-04993540d-300x225The recent tease of warm weather has left people dreaming about resuming their favorite outdoor activities. For many, that includes recreational boating activities like fishing, sailing and even kayaking. The U.S. National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) has warned, however, that a rise in the number of recreational vessels sharing the waterways with commercial vessels has led to an increased risk of boating accidents.

To help lessen the risks, the NTSB strongly suggested that the U.S. Coast Guard require recreational boaters to undergo safety instruction that meets standards equivalent to those set by the National Association of State Boating Law Administrators. For more information on how the risk of accidents and injuries on our waterways has increased in recent years, read “Recreational Boaters Need Safety Training.”

Workplace safety - photo of worker at building site wearing yellow reflective vest and holding yellow hardhatInjuries in the workplace can prove costly for both employer and employee. Missed work, medical expenses and sometimes even legal costs all add up to create financial hardship for the injured party as well as the company held responsible for the injury.

Many workplace injuries can be avoided simply by employing some common sense strategies. Business owners may want to take the time to review their company’s safety policies to make sure they are comprehensive and that they are being followed. The article “7 Key Tactics The Pros Use To Avoid Workplace Injuries” outlines some steps to take to improve workplace safety.

Photo of top of open brown medicine bottle with black and red capsules spilling outThe New Jersey Supreme Court ruled that an Alabama man was entitled to the $25 million awarded to him by a jury in connection with his 2003 lawsuit against Hoffman LaRoche.

The original lawsuit claimed the man had become seriously ill after taking Accutane, a drug manufactured by the New Jersey-based pharmaceutical company for the treatment of acne. It further claimed the company did not properly disclose the potential effects and health risks of the drug.

The man was awarded damages in 2010. An appellate court overturned the verdict stating the lawsuit was filed too late under Alabama law.

Photo of double escalator viewed from bottomA New Jersey family recently filed suit against the Oxford Valley Mall and the Schindler Corporation, which operates the escalators at the mall, claiming the two entities were responsible for a 2014 incident in which the family’s young son was seriously injured.

According to reports, during a shopping trip to the mall in December 2014, the boy and his mother were riding the escalator when the boy’s foot became trapped between the step and the side panel of the escalator. It took emergency services personnel close of a half-hour to free the child’s foot and doctors later had to amputate the toes on the injured foot. The suit claims the boy was permanently disfigured and disabled and family members were traumatized as a result of the accident. For additional details, read “Parents sue after 7-year-old boy loses tows in escalator accident.”

food-processor-recall-400-07820538d-200x300Conair Corp. last month recalled about eight million Cuisinart brand food processors just as home cooks were putting the machines to work chopping, grating and mixing food in preparation for the Christmas and Hanukkah holidays. The recall, which involves the stainless steel riveted blades in Cuisinart food processors sold nationwide between July 1996 and December 2015, came after the company received more than 65 complaints from consumers who found pieces of broken blades in food that had been processed with these machines. About 30 of those complaints included reports of cuts to the mouth and tooth injuries.

The sheer number of machines affected makes this one of the three largest appliance recalls ever in America. Consumers were urged to stop using their food processors and contact Cuisinart for a replacement blade. However the timing of the recall, coupled with the fact that homemakers could have had the food processors in their kitchens for more than 20 years, caused some consumers to decide to keep a careful eye on their holiday food preparation rather than participate in the recall. If you own a Cuisinart food processor and want to see if it is affected by this recall, read “8M Cuisinart Food Processors Recalled Over Laceration Hazard.”